General Watering Guidelines for Plants

Watering is a procedure in plant maintenance that is too often hurriedly performed. Newly planted trees and shrubs require more water than older, established plants. Proper watering during the growing season is the single most important factor in promoting optimal plant health. Protect your investment by monitoring the water needs of your plants.

Visual inspection of a plant will provide clues as to its water requirements. Dry, wilted leaves signify too little water. Wilted leaves that turn brown and curl under at the edges are a sign of too much water. When watering, apply sufficient water so that the soil containing the roots is thoroughly moist. Allow the soil to dry in-between watering so that so that the soil is slightly moist but not “bone dry”.

As a general rule, newly planted trees, shrubs, evergreens, and perennials should be watered two or three times a week, depending on the weather. In a very hot and dry season, any plants planted that spring or previous winter should be checked regularly for water requirements. Drought generally affects the most recently planted material first.

Important points to remember:

  1. It is more important to monitor the water needs of your plants than to water them frequently.
  2. Water thoroughly, but not to excess based on your soil type.
  3. Do not depend on irrigation systems for watering new trees and shrubs.
  4. Weather conditions will play a large role in determining when to water. Rainy, cloudy, cooler weather means watering less often. Sunny, windy, and warmer weather requires more frequent watering. In a dry fall/winter season, water new plants through the fall and, when the winter temperature is mild.
  5. In general, newly planted trees and shrubs should be watered thoroughly 3 times a week.
  6. Large trees: 5-10 minutes – more if root ball is very dry – Check by probing as described below.
  7. Smaller trees and shrubs: 2-5 minutes.
  8. Perennials and vines: up to one minute.
  9. A watering schedule should be established and continued for at least a year.
  10. When warm spells occur during winter months, plants should be watered as alternate freezing and thawing will dry the soils almost as rapidly as direct sun.

Larger plants require more water than smaller plants. The amount applied will also vary depending on the weather and soil conditions. Hot, dry days mean more frequent irrigation. Cool and moderately wet periods mean less watering. It is always a good idea to check the soil before and after watering, until you have a better idea of how much water your plant requires.

One method for checking soil moisture is to use a probe. A small hand shovel or a long kitchen knife make adequate probes. Try to push the probe as deep as possible into the soil. If the probe is muddy or wet when withdrawn, the soil is too wet. If the probe enters easily and is reasonably clean when withdrawn, conditions are about right. If the probe will not enter easily, the soil is too dry.


Remember: Proper watering during the first growing season is the single most important factor in promoting
optimal plant health. If you are uncertain, concerned or have any questions, do not hesitate to call immediately.

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What Our Customer’s Have To Say…

I do believe you have magic powers.  Please tell Alex that John and I can attest to your magic.  I went out last night (got out of bed and dressed) at about 9pm, and it was just awesome!  I felt so moved that I walked down the driveway and across the grass to get the big picture.  It was truly magic — like a wonderland.  I am so impressed I don’t know what to say.  Thank you so much. Please let the guys know how happy we are with their work.  Hope to see you soon.

— Blessings to all, Tanny

General Watering Guidelines for Plants

Watering is a procedure in plant maintenance that is too often hurriedly performed. Newly planted trees and shrubs require more water than older, established plants. Proper watering during the growing season is the single most important factor in promoting optimal plant health. Protect your investment by monitoring the water needs of your plants.

Visual inspection of a plant will provide clues as to its water requirements. Dry, wilted leaves signify too little water. Wilted leaves that turn brown and curl under at the edges are a sign of too much water. When watering, apply sufficient water so that the soil containing the roots is thoroughly moist. Allow the soil to dry in-between watering so that so that the soil is slightly moist but not “bone dry”.

As a general rule, newly planted trees, shrubs, evergreens, and perennials should be watered two or three times a week, depending on the weather. In a very hot and dry season, any plants planted that spring or previous winter should be checked regularly for water requirements. Drought generally affects the most recently planted material first.

Important points to remember:

  1. It is more important to monitor the water needs of your plants than to water them frequently.
  2. Water thoroughly, but not to excess based on your soil type.
  3. Do not depend on irrigation systems for watering new trees and shrubs.
  4. Weather conditions will play a large role in determining when to water. Rainy, cloudy, cooler weather means watering less often. Sunny, windy, and warmer weather requires more frequent watering. In a dry fall/winter season, water new plants through the fall and, when the winter temperature is mild.
  5. In general, newly planted trees and shrubs should be watered thoroughly 3 times a week.
  6. Large trees: 5-10 minutes – more if root ball is very dry – Check by probing as described below.
  7. Smaller trees and shrubs: 2-5 minutes.
  8. Perennials and vines: up to one minute.
  9. A watering schedule should be established and continued for at least a year.
  10. When warm spells occur during winter months, plants should be watered as alternate freezing and thawing will dry the soils almost as rapidly as direct sun.

Larger plants require more water than smaller plants. The amount applied will also vary depending on the weather and soil conditions. Hot, dry days mean more frequent irrigation. Cool and moderately wet periods mean less watering. It is always a good idea to check the soil before and after watering, until you have a better idea of how much water your plant requires.

One method for checking soil moisture is to use a probe. A small hand shovel or a long kitchen knife make adequate probes. Try to push the probe as deep as possible into the soil. If the probe is muddy or wet when withdrawn, the soil is too wet. If the probe enters easily and is reasonably clean when withdrawn, conditions are about right. If the probe will not enter easily, the soil is too dry.


Remember: Proper watering during the first growing season is the single most important factor in promoting
optimal plant health. If you are uncertain, concerned or have any questions, do not hesitate to call immediately.


What Our Customer’s Have To Say…

I do believe you have magic powers.  Please tell Alex that John and I can attest to your magic.  I went out last night (got out of bed and dressed) at about 9pm, and it was just awesome!  I felt so moved that I walked down the driveway and across the grass to get the big picture.  It was truly magic — like a wonderland.  I am so impressed I don’t know what to say.  Thank you so much. Please let the guys know how happy we are with their work.  Hope to see you soon.

— Blessings to all, Tanny

General Watering Guidelines for Plants

Watering is a procedure in plant maintenance that is too often hurriedly performed. Newly planted trees and shrubs require more water than older, established plants. Proper watering during the growing season is the single most important factor in promoting optimal plant health. Protect your investment by monitoring the water needs of your plants.

Visual inspection of a plant will provide clues as to its water requirements. Dry, wilted leaves signify too little water. Wilted leaves that turn brown and curl under at the edges are a sign of too much water. When watering, apply sufficient water so that the soil containing the roots is thoroughly moist. Allow the soil to dry in-between watering so that so that the soil is slightly moist but not “bone dry”.

As a general rule, newly planted trees, shrubs, evergreens, and perennials should be watered two or three times a week, depending on the weather. In a very hot and dry season, any plants planted that spring or previous winter should be checked regularly for water requirements. Drought generally affects the most recently planted material first.

Important points to remember:

  1. It is more important to monitor the water needs of your plants than to water them frequently.
  2. Water thoroughly, but not to excess based on your soil type.
  3. Do not depend on irrigation systems for watering new trees and shrubs.
  4. Weather conditions will play a large role in determining when to water. Rainy, cloudy, cooler weather means watering less often. Sunny, windy, and warmer weather requires more frequent watering. In a dry fall/winter season, water new plants through the fall and, when the winter temperature is mild.
  5. In general, newly planted trees and shrubs should be watered thoroughly 3 times a week.
  6. Large trees: 5-10 minutes – more if root ball is very dry – Check by probing as described below.
  7. Smaller trees and shrubs: 2-5 minutes.
  8. Perennials and vines: up to one minute.
  9. A watering schedule should be established and continued for at least a year.
  10. When warm spells occur during winter months, plants should be watered as alternate freezing and thawing will dry the soils almost as rapidly as direct sun.

Larger plants require more water than smaller plants. The amount applied will also vary depending on the weather and soil conditions. Hot, dry days mean more frequent irrigation. Cool and moderately wet periods mean less watering. It is always a good idea to check the soil before and after watering, until you have a better idea of how much water your plant requires.

One method for checking soil moisture is to use a probe. A small hand shovel or a long kitchen knife make adequate probes. Try to push the probe as deep as possible into the soil. If the probe is muddy or wet when withdrawn, the soil is too wet. If the probe enters easily and is reasonably clean when withdrawn, conditions are about right. If the probe will not enter easily, the soil is too dry.


Remember: Proper watering during the first growing season is the single most important factor in promoting
optimal plant health. If you are uncertain, concerned or have any questions, do not hesitate to call immediately.


What Our Customer’s Have To Say…

I do believe you have magic powers.  Please tell Alex that John and I can attest to your magic.  I went out last night (got out of bed and dressed) at about 9pm, and it was just awesome!  I felt so moved that I walked down the driveway and across the grass to get the big picture.  It was truly magic — like a wonderland.  I am so impressed I don’t know what to say.  Thank you so much. Please let the guys know how happy we are with their work.  Hope to see you soon.

— Blessings to all, Tanny

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